Evangelicals, Catholics Vote for Hell

Evangelicals, Catholics Vote for Hell

It was estimated that 20 million Evangelical Christians failed to vote in the 2008 presidential election. That lack of voting alone gave Obama the election providing the majority of those votes had gone to McCain.

The train wreck of 2012 is now showing results that are very disturbing and demonstrate that the self-righteous bunch who think they are Gods children and the only Christian true believers aided and abetted the reelection of Barack Hussein Obama.

Let me be clear, other religious voting blocks stayed home and failed the American people and the country as a whole.

Carefully sifting through exit poll data we come up with the following:

  • 42% of the Protestant Christian vote went for Obama in 2012. This was down from 45% in 2008.
  • 57% of the Protestant Christian vote went for Romney in 2012. This was up from 54% that McCain won in 2008.
  • When you zoom in a bit, you find that 21% of self-identified, white, born-again, evangelical Christians voted for Obama in 2012. This means of the 117 million people who voted on Tuesday, about 24.7 million were evangelicals who voted for Obama. This was down from 24% of evangelicals who voted for Obama in 2008. (Of the 125 million people who voted in 2008, about 30 million were evangelicals who voted for Obama.)
  • You’d think this decrease in evangelical votes for Obama would have helped win the race for Romney, but it didn’t.
  • 78% of evangelical Christians voted for Romney in 2012. Yes, this was up from the 74% that McCain received in 2008, but it wasn’t nearly enough.
  • To put it more precisely, about 5 million fewer evangelicals voted for Obama in 2012 than in 2008. Meanwhile, some 4.7 million more evangelicals voted for Romney than voted for McCain. Yet Romney still couldn’t win.
  • Meanwhile, 50% of the Catholic vote went for Obama in 2012. This was down from the 54% that Obama won in 2008.
  • 48% of the Catholic vote went for Romney in 2012. This was up from the 45% that McCain won in 2008. Yet it still wasn’t enough.

Now consider this additional data:

  • In 2008, white, born-again, evangelical Christians represented 26% of the total vote for president, according to the exit polls.
  • In 2012, white, born-again, evangelical Christians represented 26% of the total vote for president, according to the exit polls.
  • In other words, we saw no change at all in the size of the evangelical vote, – no net gain, certainly no surge, no record evangelical turnout, despite expectations of this.
  • What’s more, in 2008, 27% of the total vote for president was Catholic, according to the exit polls.
  • In 2012, 25% of the total vote for president was Catholic.
  • Remarkably, this means that Romney got a higher percentage of the Catholic vote than McCain, but millions of fewer Catholics actually voted in 2012, despite having Rep. Paul Ryan, a practicing Catholic, on the ticket.

What does all this mean? A few observations:

  1. During the GOP primaries in 2012, it was reported that there was record turnout by evangelical voters — they were fired up and mobilized then (though largely behind Sen. Rick Santorum.)
  2. There were concerns by a number of Christian leaders going into the 2012 elections that Romney’s Mormonism might suppress evangelical and conservative voter turnout.
  3. The Romney campaign worked hard to not only to win the evangelical vote but to turn out more evangelicals to the polls — but it did not work.
  4. Despite Obama’s pro-abortion, pro-gay marriage, anti-religious freedom record — a record presumably abhorrent both to evangelicals and conservative Catholics — Romney simply was not able to cut deeply enough into Obama’s evangelical and Catholic vote.
  5. If Romney had been able win over another 3.5 million to 4 million evangelicals – and/or dramatically increased evangelical turnout in the right states – and Romney would have won the election handily.
  6. It is stunning to think that 25 million self-described evangelical Christians would vote for a President who supports abortion on demand; supported the same-sex marriage ballot initiatives that successed in Maryland, Maine and Washington; and was on the cover of Newsweek as America’s “first gay president.”Did these self-professed believers surrender their Biblical convictions in the voting booth, or did they never really have deep Biblical convictions on the critical issues to begin with?
  7. Whatever their reasons, these so-called evangelicals doomed Romney and a number of down-ballot candidates for the House and Senate.
  8. This is what happens when the Church is weak and fails to disciple believers to turn Biblical faith into action.
  9. Given the enormous number of evangelical Christians in the U.S., this bloc could still affect enormous positive change for their issues if they were to unify and vote for the pro-life, pro-marriage candidate as a bloc.
  10. What will it take to educate, register and mobilize Christians to vote on the basis of Biblical principles, and what kind of candidates could best mobilize them? This is a critical question that Christian political leaders as well as pastors must serious consider. As we have seen, just a few million more evangelicals voting for pro-life, pro-marriage candidates could offset other demographics that are becoming more liberal.
  11. That said, we need national candidates who take values issues as seriously as economic and fiscal issues, and have strong credentials on these values issues, and can talk about these issues in a winsome, compassionate, effective manner.
  12. We need pastors registering voters in their churches and teaching the people in their congregations the importance of the civic duty of voting.
  13. None of this should come, however, at the expense of pastors and other Christian leaders clearly, boldly and unequivocally teaching and preaching the Word, proclaiming the Gospel, and making disciples, and helping believers learn to live out their faith in a real and practical way in their communities, including being “salt” and “light” to preserve what is good in society. What we need most in America isn’t a political revival but a sweeping series of spiritual revivals — a Third Great Awakening. As men and women’s hearts are transformed by the Gospel of Jesus Christ, they will, in time, vote for the values they are internalizing from the Bible. If we don’t see a Third Great Awakening soon, I’m not convinced we will be able to turn this dear nation around in time.

Religious beliefs or simple common sense. if American’s choose not to pay attention to issues and understand how policies can alter their lives negatively then America is doomed.

With the reelection of Barack Obama and certain professed religious individuals voting for Barack Obama or not voting at all I’m afraid the horse has left the barn. So called leaders in the GOP such as Eric Cantor and John Boehner are weak and want to demonstrate they are bi-partisan which usually means they will compromise with the Left on big issues that over time will permanently alter the economy, and ultimately the freedom we draw from the US Constitution.

In the end, the moral fiber in America has dissipated over time which has resulted in diluting our Constitutional rights as a people.

“I went to bed last night thinking we’re outnumbered,” said Rush Limbaugh on his radio program on Wednesday.

“I went to bed last night thinking all this discussion we’d had about this election being the election that will tell us whether or not we’ve lost the country. I went to bed last night thinking we’ve lost the country. I don’t know how else you look at this.”

We may very well have lost our country as the United States of America has slowly lost its moral compass.

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